How to save a choking Senator Heimlich heirs Red Cross disagree on

first_imgCarmen Heredia Rodriguez: CarmenH@kff.org, @caheredia21 This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Jul 25 2018Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) found herself in a dangerous situation last month when she started choking during a Democratic members’ luncheon. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) swooped in, grabbed her around the middle and squeezed her, performing the Heimlich maneuver to dislodge the food.Manchin’s act likely saved McCaskill’s life. But in Washington, where no topic seems immune to controversy, Manchin’s use of the well-known technique has resurfaced a decades-old debate about whether to slap or squeeze.Phil and Janet Heimlich aim to end that controversy. The son and daughter of Dr. Henry Heimlich, who developed the abdominal thrusts to stop choking more than four decades ago and died in 2016, are launching a campaign called “Hug, Don’t Hit” to raise awareness on how to use the maneuver.The duo is trying to put pressure on the American Red Cross, which trains 9 million people a year in lifesaving techniques, according to its website. The Red Cross is one of several groups recommending that aid to choking victims should start with five slaps to the back followed by the Heimlich maneuver. The Heimlichs say those back blows could harm the choking victim by moving the lodged object farther down the windpipe and may waste valuable time.Janet Heimlich said, “What is really concerning to me … is that people may not be learning how to do it and they may not be learning how to do it correctly.”According to a 2017 report from the National Safety Council, choking is the fourth-leading cause of unintentional injury deaths in the United States. Nearly 5,000 people died from choking in 2016, the council reported.The Heimlich maneuver, which Heimlich first wrote about in 1974, is credited with saving many choking victims. The method involves wrapping one’s arms around the victim’s waist from behind, placing a fist above the navel, and pushing in and up. Soon after its unveiling, some experts criticized Heimlich’s methods of testing the technique, arguing that the maneuver could inflict other injuries. But over time, the Heimlich maneuver has come to be widely accepted.Janet Heimlich said that if the Red Cross teaches people to slap a choker’s back first, “they must show the public what evidence they have … that back blows are not only effective but the most effective method to use.”The Red Cross pointed to similar guidelines promoted by the Resuscitation Council, a medical group responsible for creating standards for cardiac resuscitation in the United Kingdom. The organization also referred to findings from the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, a coalition of groups that specialize in resuscitation protocols. The committee’s findings concluded that it is unclear which method should be performed first.In a statement, the Red Cross said it “doesn’t discount the use of abdominal thrusts — but we have found no scientific evidence stating that this one technique is more effective than the others. American Red Cross findings, and our conscious choking guidelines, are consistent with those of other international resuscitation societies and organizations.”It is this lack of scientific evidence proving one method more effective that fuels the debate, said Dr. Alfred Sacchetti, a spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians and chief of emergency services at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden, N.J. However, he said, conducting these studies would be difficult.”You can’t put an ad in a paper that says, ‘OK, everybody is going help a person who’s choking this way for a week,'” Sacchetti said.For those seeking training on how to save a choking victim, he recommended they take an accredited course or view demonstration videos on the American Heart Association’s website. Ultimately, he said, doing nothing could end in a person’s death.Whether the Heimlichs’ campaign will succeed in ending the speculation surrounding the back blows versus their father’s maneuver remains to be seen. But what can’t be disputed is that the maneuver worked in McCaskill’s case — even if it left her with a cracked rib.”I’m really grateful to Joe,” she said in a statement to The Washington Post. “A little bit of a sore rib for a couple of weeks is no big deal.”last_img read more

Marmosets can mimic both motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinsons disease

first_img Source:https://www.txbiomed.org/news-press/news-releases/marmosets-serve-as-an-effective-model-for-non-motor-symptoms-of-parkinsons-disease/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Small, New World monkeys called marmosets can mimic the sleep disturbances, changes in circadian rhythm, and cognitive impairment people with Parkinson’s disease develop, according to a new study by scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute.By developing an effective animal model that can emulate both the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, scientists have a better chance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of the neuro-circuitry responsible for changes in the brain during the course of the disease. Scans like magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) and analysis after dissections may lead to potential targets for new therapies for patients.Associate Scientist Marcel Daadi, Ph.D., leader of the Regenerative Medicine and Aging Unit at the Southwest National Primate Research Center on the Texas Biomed campus, is the lead author of the study that tracked marmosets using devices around their necks similar to Fitbits humans use to track their activity and sleep. The study was published in a recent edition of the journal PLOS ONE. In the case of the tiny monkeys, investigators wanted to see if the marmosets with induced classic Parkinson’s motor symptoms – like tremors – could also serve as an effective model for non-motor symptoms. In addition, scientists videotaped the animals to monitor their ability to perform certain tasks and how those abilities were impacted over time by the disease.Related StoriesMice study finds additional evidence that Parkinson’s disease originates in the gutGut infection can lead to a pathology resembling Parkinson’s diseaseStudy unravels how cancer medication works in brains of Parkinson’s patients”Most of the early studies in Parkinson’s have been conducted with rodents,” Dr. Daadi explained, “but there are some complex aspects of this disease you simply cannot investigate using rodents in a way that is relevant to human patients. Nonhuman primates are critical in his aspect because we can see these symptoms clearly whether it is the dyskinesia (abnormality or impairment of voluntary movements), or the sleep disturbances that you can monitor or the fine motors skills.”Parkinson’s disease affects a million people in the United States and 10 million people worldwide. With the aging population, the incidence of the neurodegenerative disorder is on the rise. 60,000 people are diagnosed with Parkinson’s each year in the U.S. alone. The hallmark symptoms of Parkinson’s include tremors, slow movements, balance problems and rigid or stiff muscles. However, non-motor symptoms including disorders of the sleep-wake cycle and problems thinking clearly can be just as difficult for patients to handle.”This study is a great first step,” Dr. Daadi stated. “More studies are needed to expand on these non-motor symptoms in marmosets in the longer-term, and perhaps, include other nonhuman primates at the SNPRC like macaques and baboons.”last_img read more

Ancient whale fossilized with its last meal

first_imgBeaked whales, which often have dolphinlike snouts rather than blunt muzzles, typically dive hundreds of meters or more to chase squid, fish, and other prey. But at least one ancestral species in this group of toothed whales, also known as ziphiids, was cruising near-surface waters for its meals, new evidence from newly described fossils suggest. Those remains—the first of any toothed whale to also include fossils of its presumed prey, researchers say—were unearthed along the southwestern coast of Peru last year. The rocks that entombed the partial remains of the whale (Messapicetus gregarius, depicted in an artist’s reconstruction, above) accumulated as sea-floor sediments between 8.9 million and 9.9 million years ago, other fossils in the rocks suggest. The whale’s remains would be largely unremarkable if not for the large number of sardinelike fish preserved inside its chest cavity and around its head. Because scales of the fish show few signs of being exposed to stomach acid, the fish must have been consumed  shortly before the whale died and sank to the sea floor, the researchers report online today in the  Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Scales of such fish are rarely preserved in the rocks of that area, so those fish (which likely fed at or near the ocean’s surface, as their modern kin do) probably are the remains of the whale’s last meal and were expelled from the carcass as decomposition bloated the whale’s gut, the researchers propose. The size of the whale’s last meal—somewhere between 40 and 60 fish averaging 39 centimeters in length and together weighing between 16 and 25 kilograms—generally matches a stomach full of fish consumed by similar-sized modern-day relatives. The new find helps shed light on the evolution of beaked whales as well as their competition: Soon after M. gregarius swam the region’s seas, dolphins appeared on the scene, and their success in shallow coastal waters (where they now dominate), may have driven ziphiids to abandon foraging in surface waters.last_img read more

Feeling sleepy You may confess to a crime you didnt commit

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Didn’t get your 40 winks last night? Better not get yourself arrested, or you may admit to a crime you didn’t commit. False confessions are surprisingly easy to extract from people simply by keeping them awake, according to a new study of sleep deprivation. It puts hard numbers to a problem that criminal law reformers have worried about for decades.The “crime” in question took place in a sleep lab run by Kimberly Fenn at Michigan State University in East Lansing. Together, she and Elizabeth Loftus, a psychologist at the University of California (UC), Irvine, and two of their former Ph.D. students recruited 88 Michigan State students to take part in an experiment. During two separate visits, the students worked at computers solving problems and filling out questionnaires. They were all given a stern warning: Do not press the escape key, because it will erase important study data.After their second session, the subjects were split into two groups. Half of them were forced to stay awake all night under the watch of the researchers. Scrabble, TV shows, and a card game called euchre seemed to do the trick. The rest were allowed to get a full night’s sleep. But that also required policing. “We actually had a student leave the study because he wanted to stay awake all night to study for an exam the next day,” Fenn says, adding that “I certainly do not advocate this!”center_img Email The next morning, everyone received a typed statement describing their performance. The statement accused them of hitting the escape key on the first day, even though none of them actually did so—the computers recorded all keystrokes. Then they were asked to sign the statement to confirm its accuracy. If they refused, they were asked a second time to sign.When they were asked the first time to confess, only eight of the 44 well-rested subjects admitted guilt; asking them a second time doubled that number. So even clear-headed people could be fooled into making a false confession. But losing sleep boosted those numbers significantly: 22 of the sleep-deprived subjects made a false confession when asked once, and 30 of the 44 confessed when asked again, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The study puts hard numbers to a trend on which interrogators have long relied. Sleep deprivation was used to elicit confessions in the early years of the Catholic inquisition, 17th century witch hunts, and more recently during 20th century U.S. policing and Soviet interrogations.”Every year more and more people are released from prison who were convicted on the basis of a confession that turns out to be false,” Aaron Benjamin, a psychologist at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. “It’s counterintuitive that people would admit to having committed a major crime if they hadn’t, but they do.” The experiment may seem like a far cry from a real police interrogation, but “suspects are often interrogated late at night or after a long period of being held in a police station where sleep is difficult or even discouraged.” And that may be leading to more false confessions.So should all suspects and witnesses be given a full night’s sleep before giving a statement to the police? Letting suspects sleep will protect the innocent but may also let more criminals off the hook by helping them resist interrogation, says John Wixted, a psychologist at UC San Diego who recently published a study on the vulnerability of eyewitnesses to false accusation. “As the authors point out, sleep deprivation would presumably increase true confessions,” because it seems to compromise self-control, Wixted says. “Thus, from a purely scientific standpoint—setting aside ethical consideration—it’s a tradeoff.”last_img read more

Ancient poop shows how diseases may have spread along the Silk Road

first_imgThe proof is often in the pudding, but sometimes it’s in the poop. That’s the case in western China, where scientists have found fossilized intestinal parasites in 2000-year-old human excrement: the first evidence of infectious diseases spreading along the Silk Road. Preserved by the arid climate and stone walls of the latrine in which they were found, the poo was deposited on “hygiene sticks,” bamboo sticks with strips of cloth used to wipe the nether regions. The sticks, excavated in 1992 from a latrine at a relay station where travelers most likely slept and ate, were kept in a museum and forgotten about until now. The sticks—and their trimmings—were transported to the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, where researchers examined the feces under microscopes. They discovered eggs from four different parasites, including the Chinese liver fluke—a flatworm endemic to marshy areas. People contract the parasite by eating infected fish. Because the sticks were found on the eastern edge of the Taklamakan desert—dry and arid even then—scientists concluded the parasite must have been picked up from the marshy lands of modern-day Guangdong province, about 2000 kilometers away. The findings, reported today in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, suggests two things: that infectious diseases were carried and spread along the Silk Road, and that these early travelers toted a lot more than silk.last_img read more

Test your smarts on microquakes the latest map of the human brain

first_img In the latest attempt to map the human cortex—the wrinkly, outermost layers of the brain involved in sensory and motor processing, language, and reasoning—how many distinct areas did scientists find? In more news on interspecies interaction, a new study suggests some humpback whales may be altruistically intervening on this animal’s behalf: Hot air from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Cleveland, Ohio Turkey Question Weddell seals. At first it seemed like the usual clever attack. Several killer whales were trying to catch a Weddell seal that had taken refuge atop a drifting patch of Antarctic ice. The orcas swam alongside each other, creating a wave that knocked the hapless pinniped into the water. Death seemed certain. Then something amazing happened: A pair of humpback whales turned up and pushed the seal to safety. Scientsist aren’t sure why this—and similar rescues—are taking place, but they suspect that it might be due to inadvertent altruism. Turkey Top Ranker Ukraine July 25, 2016 Honeyguides. Of all the relationships between people and wild animals, few are more heartwarming than that of African human honey hunters and a starling-sized bird called the greater honeyguide. Flitting and calling, the bird leads the way to a bee nest and feasts on the wax left after the hunters have raided it. A new study shows that this mutualistic relationship is even tighter than it seemed, with the bird recognizing and responding to specific calls from its human partners. The end of La Niña July 25, 2016 The Science Quiz Take the quiz to enter for a chance to win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Learn More 0 / 10 Indonesia You Average Score The Science Quiz Sexual contact Start Quiz Hide artery-clogging cells from the immune system. Researchers found that a drug developed to fight cancer might also clear arteries of the dangerous plaque that increases the risk of heart attack or stroke. They found that dead cells in the plaque bear molecules on their surfaces that protect them from immune cells that are supposed to gobble them up and get them out of the way. Those same “don’t eat me!” signals are abundant on cancer cells, and they can be blocked with an antibody. The drug is already in clinical trials for cancer, and the team behind the new work hopes they can make a quick leap to human testing for cardiovascular disease. Six High pressure in the upper atmosphere A new species of mosquito A blood transfusion Click to enter 25 Win a FREE digital subscription to Science! Just submit the required contact information to enter. Hide artery-clogging cells from the immune system Last week, scientists described a curious case of Zika discovered in the U.S. state of Utah. What might it have been spread by? 180. For more than a century, neuroscientists have relied on cortical maps originally conceived in the early 1900s by neurologist Korbinian Brodmann and his disciples. Now, neuroscientists have created a long-overdue update for those early diagrams, using anatomical and functional brain data, including the thickness and number of folds in the cortex and what activity different regions displayed in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner during a given task. They found 180 distinct areas, including nearly 100 that have never been described before. The sharper, multilayered map will allow for more detailed comparisons between humans and other primates, shedding light on how our brains evolved. It could also prove a boon to neurosurgeons as they decide where to insert their scalpels. Bearcats LOADING Scientists still aren’t sure Weddell seals Gold nanoparticles Constrict arteries Coronal mass ejections Share your score Prompt hunger If you live in the eastern half of the United States, you might have been lucky enough to experience a sweltering bubble of high temperatures that meteorologists call a heat dome. What is causing this heat dome? What force can trigger microquakes—slow, small tremors that take place deep under Earth’s surface? Keyboard catscenter_img The faster you answer, the higher you score! Challenge your friends and sign up for your chance to win a free digital subscription to Science. Storms pushing in from the western Pacific 180 Every Monday, The Science Quiz tests your knowledge of the week’s biggest science news stories. No matter how much you know, you’re still likely to learn something — give it a try! What material did scientists use last week to create a single-atom memory storage device? The gravitational pull of the sun and moon Iran Chlorine-coated copper A. Pasieka/Science Source Dilithium crystals Kevin Bacon Turkey. It may seem strange that the government can seize control of academia with a single decree. But last week, the Turkish government did just that. In the wake of a failed coup attempt, some 15,000 staff members of the ministry of education were fired, 21,000 teachers lost their professional licenses, and more than 1500 university deans were all but ordered to resign. It appears to be part of a massive political purge in which the government has arrested and fired thousands of people. And educators across the country are bracing for more bad news after the government last week suspended teachers and academic deans and ordered universities to call back Turkish academics from abroad. Housecats More than 2000 Scientists still aren’t sure. It’s well known that Zika spreads primarily through mosquito bites and sexual contact, but it seems that someone in Utah became infected after caring for an elderly patient who had the virus. That patient died in late June after visiting a country where the Zika virus is present, and lab tests revealed that the patient had a viral load 100,000 times greater than that usually seen in infected individuals. How the patient’s caretaker contracted the infection is still not clear; he or she had not visited an area where the virus is circulating and did not have sex with anyone known to be infected. Scientists and academics in this country are fearful for their research and their lives, after recent political upheavals: Killer whales Enter the information below to enter the sweepstakes:Your information has been submitted.An error occurred submitting the email. Please try again later.This email has already been entered.The email submitted is not a valid email.Incomplete form. Please fill out all fields. 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I would like to receive emails about products and services offered by AAAS advertisers.PRIVACY I have read and accept the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.Submit A new study shows that humans can communicate directly with this animal: There’s a new potential treatment for cardiovascular disease. It works by blocking signals in the body that do what? Enter for a chance to win. We’ll select a new winner each week. The gravitational pull of the sun and moon. Bacon might be able to stir things up on the surface, but down below—about 20 to 30 kilometers down—there’s a whole lot of shaking going on. That’s where hundreds of thousands of slow microearthquakes called tremors go off routinely where Earth’s brittle crust gets weaker and softer. Now, scientists have shown that the tremors are triggered by the rhythmic pulsing of the tides: not just the twice-daily tides that occur as the moon revolves around Earth, but also the twice-monthly spring tides that occur when the sun and moon align and pull strongly on the planet. The finding gives scientists new insight into how stress builds up on small patches of the fault until they snap. Finally, in what modern-day country did researchers find evidence of the earliest spread of infectious diseases along the Silk Road? Official rules for the News from Science weekly quiz sweepstakes China Move cholesterol-rich cells into artery walls Venezuela Time’s Up! Silver-infused white ceramic Honeyguides Humboldt squids High pressure in the upper atmosphere. It isn’t America’s national conventions that are causing temperatures to soar. Instead, it’s a bubble of high pressure triggered by the beginning of La Niña and an infusion of moisture into the atmosphere caused by heavy July rains, humid winds from Mexico, and a sticky little phenomenon known as corn sweat. How long will the dome last? Some models say through the end of this week, but forecasters can’t say for certain. Hopefully not as long as domes of the Stephen King variety. How did you score on the quiz? Challenge your friends to a science news duel! Results: You answered out of correctly – Click to revisit Image courtesy of TU Delft An error occurred loading the Quiz. Please try again later. China. The proof is often in the pudding, but sometimes it’s in the poop. That’s the case when scientists found fossilized intestinal parasites in 2000-year-old human excrement—the first evidence of infectious diseases spreading along the Silk Road. Preserved by the arid climate and stone walls of the latrine in which they were found, the poo was deposited on “hygiene sticks,” bamboo sticks with strips of cloth used to wipe the nether regions. Deep within, scientists discovered eggs from four different parasites, including the Chinese liver fluke―a flatworm endemic to marshy areas. Because the sticks were found in the desert, scientists concluded the parasite must have been picked up in ancient marshlands about 2000 kilometers away. The finding suggests two things: that infectious diseases were carried and spread along the Silk Road, and that these early travelers toted a lot more than silk. Italy Chlorine-coated copper. Today’s computer hard disk drives pack much more information than they used to—10,000 times more than even 15 years ago. Now, scientists have come up with a way to store even more data—on the atomic scale. To do so, they evaporated chlorine atoms atop a copper surface, which assembled themselves into a gridlike pattern with a small number of empty spots. They then used a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to move individual chlorine atoms around, encoding a series of 0s and 1s into a 12×12 array of rectangular blocks. By precisely controlling the empty spots—places missing a chlorine atom—the team encoded 160 words from Richard Feynman’s “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” lecture, among other writings. Although the process of reading and writing data with an STM remains too slow to make a useful data storage technology, it shows it’s possible to store as much as 500 terabits—or 62.5 terabytes—of data per 6.5 square centimeters, another 500 times better than today’s hard disk technology. Shifts in Earth’s magnetic field Albatrosses 0last_img read more

Salk Institute settles last of three gender discrimination lawsuits

first_imgThe Salk Institute for Biological Studies campus in San Diego, California The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, today settled the last in a trio of lawsuits filed by senior female professors in July 2017. They had accused the storied research center, founded by polio vaccine pioneer Jonas Salk, of sustained, systematic gender discrimination.Salk and lawyers for Beverly Emerson, who worked at the institute for 31 years, until her contract was not renewed in December 2017, issued a statement that said: Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) REX BOGGS (CC BY-SA 2.0) Email The Salk Institute and Dr. Beverly Emerson announce that they have resolved the litigation filed by Dr. Emerson last year.  Salk recognizes Dr. Emerson’s more than thirty years of service to the Institute and looks forward to her continued contributions to the scientific community. By Meredith WadmanNov. 21, 2018 , 3:00 PMcenter_img Salk said it would not comment beyond the statement. Emerson, 66, currently a distinguished scientist with the Cancer Early Detection Advanced Research Center at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, said she could not comment except to say, “I settled because it was time.” Emerson and Salk had been set to go to trial on 14 January 2019. She alleged in her lawsuit that the institute was guilty of “systematically undermining and marginalizing” its senior female professors. Her lawsuit, like those filed by the other two plaintiffs, accused Salk’s male leadership of promoting its tenured women more slowly, underpaying them relative to their male peers, pressuring them to downsize their labs, and shutting them out of funding opportunities.Salk initially defended itself with a statement that diminished the women’s scientific records.In August, Salk settled out of court with the other two plaintiffs: Vicki Lundblad, 66, an expert in telomeres, the structures that cap chromosomes; and Kathy Jones, 63, who studies gene transcription. The terms were not disclosed. Jones and Lundblad have both resumed working at the institute.ScienceInsider reported in August that “After the suits were filed, internal documents leaked to Science exposed long-standing gender tensions at the institute. … Two of the lawsuits also accused a veteran Salk scientist, Inder Verma, of actively impeding the women’s advancement. Subsequently, eight women made sexual harassment allegations against Verma, who has since resigned from Salk.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Salk Institute settles last of three gender discrimination lawsuits Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Controversial European policy bans ships from throwing unwanted fish overboard

first_img Email By Erik StokstadJan. 4, 2019 , 8:30 AM A new European policy bans the practice of discarding fish, such as this cod. Controversial European policy bans ships from throwing unwanted fish overboard Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country James Boardman/Alamy Stock Photo center_img Long before fillets reach your dinner plate, lots of seafood is thrown away. Overboard, actually. As fishing crews sort through their catches, they toss unwanted fish back into the sea—as much as 20% of the global catch. The vast majority die. On 1 January, the wasteful practice became illegal in waters of the European Union. Scientists believe the policy will lead to more efficient fisheries and eventually boost stocks. But in the short term it could mean hardship for the industry and perhaps even compromise fisheries data, because almost all crews can discard fish without anyone knowing. “This is one of the most dramatic changes in EU fisheries policy,” says Peder Andersen, an economist at the University of Copenhagen.Regulators began to phase in the discard ban, formally known as the Landing Obligation, in 2015. To ease the pain, they started with vessels that didn’t discard much because they catch schools of herring and other single species. Now comes the bigger challenge: fisheries where many species live together, such as those in the North Sea. When vessels drag nets near or along the bottom, they end up with a jumble of species and sizes. Until now, vessels only kept the valuable portion of their catch. The discarding of young fish, which haven’t yet reproduced much, has been a particular impediment to sustainability. Under the ban, fishing vessels must bring back all regulated species, a significant headache. More time will be spent sorting fish, as even the unwanted ones must be tallied and brought to port. Holds will fill up faster, meaning more trips to sea and higher fuel costs. And unwanted fish will be sold for a fraction of the price of the normal catch, if it can be sold at all. The hope is that the ban will incentivize vessels to adopt more selective fishing gear or strategies.A second problem for industry is that the ban creates the prospect of “choke species” that threaten to shut down fishing. In a fishery with a mix of species, a vessel might catch the same proportion of species each time it trawls, despite varying quotas for the allowed catch of each. Before the discard ban, this wasn’t a problem: Fishers could keep catching haddock and whiting, for example, even after reaching their cod quota. Following the law, they simply threw away any new cod caught. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Now, vessels will have to stop fishing once they reach their quota for choke species like cod in some places. Haddock or whiting quotas will go unused—a lost economic opportunity. “Choke species are a huge problem,” says Daniel Voces de Onaindi, managing director of Europêche, a lobbying group in Brussels. “We’re talking about destroying boats, and unemployment.” The discard ban does exempt species, such as Norway lobster, that typically survive after they are returned to the water. And last month, EU fisheries ministers boosted quotas for five species, despite scientific advice to protect these stocks.Still, case studies from DiscardLess, an EU-funded research project that wraps up this month, suggest the fishing industry could suffer losses on the order of 10% for several years if the ban is enforced.Over the longer term, the discard ban will boost fish stocks and benefit the overall ecosystem, according to modeling led by Marie Savina-Rolland of the French Research Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea, an oceanographic research center in Lorient. That could eventually translate to higher quotas and profits, says Andersen, who co-led economic research for the DiscardLess project.The ban could also stimulate more research on new fishing gear and tactics to avoid unwanted catches. Researchers have already shown benefits from separator trawls, which have a horizontal panel at the opening. Haddock and whiting tend to swim upward when the trawl approaches. The panel diverts them into an upper net, whereas cod and monkfish are collected by a lower net. Unwanted species can escape through an opening in the net. Equipping fishing gear with light-emitting diodes can also help reduce bycatch, DiscardLess researchers have found, by discouraging some unwanted species from entering trawl nets. But these techniques also lose some of the commercial catch, so industry has not adopted them widely. “It’s rare to get a situation where you can avoid unwanted sizes or species and not pay a penalty with the fish you do want,” says David Reid, a fisheries ecologist at the Marine Institute in Oranmore, Ireland.More quota trading could also help industry cope. If a vessel or fleet has run out of quota to catch cod in its mixed trawls, for example, it could offer its quota of whiting to a fleet with the opposite problem. Last month, EU fisheries ministers increased pressure on nations to start trading quotas. “It’s basically banging their heads together and saying you must swap quotas for this to work,” says Andrew Clayton, who directs the Pew Charitable Trusts’s campaign to end overfishing in northwest Europe and is based in London.Few expect all fishing vessels to obey the discard ban. “Put yourself in the boots of a fishermen who can see he will run out of quota for a species. If he does, he would have to tie up for the rest of the year. He might have to sell the boat, or sell the house,” says Barrie Deas, CEO of the National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations in York, U.K. “What’s he going to do?”Scofflaws could jeopardize not just fish stocks, but also data about how they are faring. Researchers, who suggest catch levels to regulators, get their discard data largely from independent observers on just a few boats—less than 1% of the EU fleet. Observed boats are now likely to discard much fewer fish than other vessels, leaving an official undercount of the discard rate and a falsely rosy picture of how heavily stocks are fished, says Lisa Borges, a fisheries biologist who runs a consultancy called FishFix in Lisbon. “It could bring about a very big, negative change,” Borges says. “I get very worried about European fisheries management.”Environmentalists want to toughen up enforcement by installing cameras on ships, the practice in New Zealand and a few other places with discard bans. But Voces de Onaindi says this is impractical on some vessels and raises privacy concerns. The lesson from countries where discard bans have succeeded, including Norway and Iceland, Andersen says, is that the gradual introduction of incentives and controls—to develop the economic use of unwanted fish, and create a culture of regulatory compliance—lessens conflict but can take decades to achieve.last_img read more

Key climate panel citing impending crisis urges crash effort to reduce emissions

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Dennis NormileOct. 8, 2018 , 7:15 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Key climate panel, citing impending crisis, urges crash effort to reduce emissions INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY PROJECT It warns that overshooting 1.5°C will be disastrous. For example, with 1.5°C of warming, sea levels are projected to rise 26 to 77 centimeters by 2100; going to 2°C adds another 10 centimeters, which would affect an additional 10 million people living in coastal regions. Plants, insects, animals, and marine life will all be pushed farther out of current geographic ranges with 2°C of warming. Coral reefs are projected to decline 70% to 90% at 1.5°C, but at 2°C, 99% of reefs would be ravaged. Storms, flooding, and drought would exact an even higher toll. “Every bit of extra warming makes a difference,” said Abdalah Mokssit, director of Morocco’s National Meteorological Department in Casablanca and IPCC secretary.The panel says keeping warming to 1.5°C is technically feasible, but the emissions cuts pledged so far by the nations that signed the Paris agreement fall far short of what’s needed. To hit and keep that 1.5°C target, net anthropogenic CO2 emissions must come down 45% from 2010 levels by 2030 and reach net zero around 2050. “We’re not on track, we’re currently heading for about 3° or 4° of warming by 2100,” Mark Howden, a climate change scientist at Australian National University in Canberra, said during an online briefing on Sunday. “The good news is that there’s actually movement in the right direction in many areas,” he added.One bright spot is renewable energy. “There [has been] exponential growth in the last 5 years in solar, wind, and batteries that is significantly changing electricity systems around the world,” Peter Newman, a sustainability scientist at Curtin University in Bentley, Australia, said during the Sunday briefing. But efforts to reduce emissions are lagging in freight, aviation, shipping, and in industry, he said.Because forests capture and sequester carbon, reforestation could help reduce net emissions. But forest loss is still outpacing reforestation globally. Other strategies to sequester carbon have yet to live up to their promise, Newman says. The report notes that one proposed approach, bioenergy with carbon capture, in which trees or other crops are grown on vast plantations, then burned in power plants that capture carbon emissions and store them underground, could encroach on agricultural land and undermine food security.Meanwhile, coal’s share of global electricity must be cut from 37% today to no more than 2% by 2050, the report says. Technologically, economically, and politically the challenge is immense, “indicative both of the scale of the challenge and the resistance [the effort will] face,” notes Shindell, who also contributed to the report.Jim Skea, a sustainable energy expert at Imperial College London, says achieving the needed emissions cuts will not be a matter of picking and choosing among options. “All options need to be exercised.” The United Nations’s climate panel has moved the goal posts for limiting climate change, setting the world a staggering challenge. A report released yesterday in Incheon, South Korea, by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says allowing the planet to warm by more than 1.5°C could have dire consequences, and that a speedy transformation of the world’s energy systems is needed to avoid breaching that limit, which is notably tighter than the target of 2°C cited in the Paris agreement of 2015. “Net [carbon dioxide] emissions at the global scale must reach zero by 2050,” said Valérie Masson-Delmotte, a climate scientist at France’s Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission in Paris and a key participant in drafting the report.There is no time for delay, the report warns, a consensus drawn from thousands of scientific studies. The world has already warmed by about 1°C since preindustrial times, two-thirds of the way toward the new target. “We have to alter course immediately; no longer can we say the window for action will close soon—we’re here now,” Drew Shindell, an atmospheric scientist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, wrote in an email to Science. Among other measures, the IPCC says, coal needs to be all but eliminated as a source of electricity, renewable power must be greatly expanded, and “negative-emissions” strategies that suck carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere need to be adopted on a large scale, particularly if emissions reductions are delayed.Under pressure from island nations at risk from sea-level rise, the United Nations agreed during the Paris negotiations to ask the IPCC to investigate the impact of 1.5°C of global warming. In what IPCC Chair Hoesung Lee, a South Korean economist, called “a Herculean effort,” more than 90 authors and reviewers from 40 countries examined 6000 scientific publications. The resulting picture is urgent and alarming. Given accumulated emissions, the report says, “Global warming is likely to reach 1.5°C between 2030 and 2052.” Email Coal-fired thermal power plants in Singrauli, India With reporting by Paul Voosen. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Ship which Sank in 1995 Found off California Coast – 3D Model

first_imgDespite mankind’s continuing explorations with modern technology, the sea still holds many secrets. One of those secrets — the precise location of the American Heritage, which sank off the coast of California many years ago — has finally been uncovered. The vessel went down in Santa Monica Bay in the spring of 1995. No one knew exactly where it was, but former members of its crew said it began taking on water and very quickly sank. All crew members were rescued by the Coast Guard.According to Live Science, the American Heritage was used to ferry men and goods back and forth from offshore oil rigs.The wreck of the American Heritage was heavily colonized by deep-sea sponges and other animals. But the name of the boat was still partly visible at the bow. Photo Credit: © 2018 MBARIFor years, no one knew exactly where it was located, but now scientists with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) have found it and created a 3D model to demonstrate just how it looks today.The Institute’s team first noticed something odd in the water that they suspected was the missing ship in 2008. However it wasn’t until last spring, May 2018, that they went back to the site and confirmed their find.The wreck is approximately 197 feet long and sits about 2,300 feet down on the ocean floor, MBARI officials said in a statement released at the end of December 2018.This screen shot shows several sonar images of the wreck of the American Heritage. These images were created using data from MBARI’s seafloor-mapping AUV during a survey of faults and submarine canyons offshore of Santa Monica Bay. Photo Credit: avid Caress © 2018 MBARIEven though researchers were fairly sure they had found the American Heritage, it wasn’t until September 2018, when they used remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to investigate the wreck, that they became certain of the identity of their discovery.The chief MBARI ROV pilot who helped confirm the find, Knute Brekke, coincidentally used to work on the American Heritage. Footage taken by the ROV revealed sea creatures clinging to the boat’s hull. Still, letters were visible on the bow, and the researchers could make a positive identification.It’s thanks to images taken by ROVs that MBARI staff have been able to render an accurate, 3D model of the boat — sea critters and all.The MBARI crew was in the area in 2008 to map out Santa Monica Canyon with an ROV when they first came upon something odd. Initially, they didn’t think they’d found a ship, let alone the American Heritage.“They called it an anomaly,” Brekke said. But when the crew returned to the area in May 2018 for another project, maps showed absolutely that a wreck was lying on the ocean floor. This time, rather than feeling helpless, as he had when the American Heritage went down, Brekke was one of the pilots operating an ROV, along with co-pilot Ben Erwin, and they were determined to find out the ship’s identity.Using MBARI’s remotely operated vehicle Doc Ricketts, researchers explored the wreck of the American Heritage and even peered inside the door to the ship’s wheelhouse. Photo Credit: © 2018 MBARIIn the initial statement released by MBARI on December 20th, Brekke recalled the tumult of that night 23 years ago. He was onshore working with APM, who owned the vessel, when the call came in that it was taking on water.As the Coast Guard were saving the crew, Brekke and the others rushed to try to save the ship. But there was not enough time. They hadn’t even left port when they got the news: the American Heritage was lost.The ship had foundered, and water rushed in through a six–eight inch hole where the propeller shaft had separated. It had all happened too fast to save the vessel.Read another story from us: World’s Oldest Intact Shipwreck Found – 2,400-year-old ‘Ship of Odysseus’But thanks to Brekke and Erwin’s efforts taking images, we can now see just what the wreck looks like as it lays there in its watery grave. Erwin spent hours developing and designing the 3D model, and anyone can log on and view it on the Sketchfab website. It’s one more mystery of the deep solved by the persistence of the teams who study it.last_img read more

Sword in the Stone in Tuscany Proven Real and Likely Inspiration for

first_imgThe sword trapped in stone, only to be freed by the forceful grip of a future king, is an essential part of the King Arthur mythology. The question of whether there’s historical basis for Arthur in the mists of chaotic Dark Ages Britain has haunted many historians, writers, and treasure seekers. Bits and pieces of the Arthur legend have been analyzed endlessly to see if some real person or place might fit. In a version of the story, Merlin foretold that only a true king was worthy to draw the sword, and when a boy, Arthur, is the one who succeeds in doing it, he reveals himself to be the son of the brave king Uther Pendragon. That sword then becomes Arthur’s powerful weapon, called Excalibur.King Arthur pulling out the sword in the stone.But what if the inspiration for the tale of the sword in the stone comes not from England but from Italy, and the proof of that can be found in a 12th century stone still thrust into bedrock in Tuscany?Montesiepi chapel in Tuscany. Photo by Adrian Michael CC BY-SA 3.0The Sword in the Stone of Saint Galgano can be seen today, in the Montesiepi chapel southwest of Siena. It was long a curiosity: Only the hilt, wooden grip and a few inches of the three foot long blade are visible to be seen in the chapel of a Cistercian abbey. The story was that it was thrust into the stone by an Italian knight, Galgano Guidotti, after he renounced war to become a hermit in 1180.Interior of Montesiepi chapel, with the sword in the stone under the clear case. Photo by Superchilum CC BY-SA 4.0For years the sword was suspected of being some sort of fake. However, recent scientific tests dealt a surprise to skeptics. The metal of the sword was confirmed to be from the 12th century.Rotonda of Montesiepi chapel, with the sword in the stone below. Photo by cisko66 CC BY 3.0“Dating metal is a very difficult task, but we can say that the composition of the metal and the style are compatible with the era of the legend,” said Luigi Garlaschelli, of the University of Pavia, in an interview with The Guardian. “We have succeeded in refuting those who maintain that it is a recent fake.”Altar of Montesiepi chapel. Photo by Superchilum CC BY-SA 4.0Not only is the sword from the medieval era but ground-penetrating radar analysis revealed that beneath the sword there is a cavity that could be a burial recess, possibly containing a body.  “To know more we’d have to excavate,” said Garlaschelli.Sword in the stone at Montesiepi chapel, San Gagnano. Photo by cisko66 CC BY 3.0The Italian academic Mario Moiraghi wrote a book suggesting that the Arthurian legend of the stone was inspired by the Tuscany sword. A 13th century English book about Merlin and the sword obviously came after the existence of the Italian sword in stone, as did Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur in the 14th century. However, Geoffrey of Monmouth wrote about Arthur, Merlin, and Excalibur, called Caliburnus (or Caliburn), in Historia, completed in 1138.The sword in the stone at Montesiepi Chapel, San Galgano. Photo by Alexmar983 CC BY-SA 3.0Moiraghi said in an interview, “The sword which, having being plunged into the stone becomes a cross; this is a true symbol of the Christian life — the transformation of violence into love.”In the same chapel are two mummified hands; scientific testing has revealed that they too date to the 12th century. According to legend, anyone who tries to steal the sword in the Tuscany chapel would have his arms ripped off.Related Video:The knight, Galgano, was the son of a feudal lord known for his arrogance and violence when he had a vision of the Archangel Michael inviting him to change his life.Galgano supposedly decided that he should become a hermit. As he climbed the mountain where he would devote his life to contemplation, a voice told him he had to leave all traces of worldly sin, to which the saint replied, “It would be easier to cut a stone with this sword to do that.”Related Article: Excalibur: the sword of King Arthur is a central theme of legends, contradictions, and modern findingsWhen Galgano stuck his sword in the rock to prove his point, the sword sank smoothly. It went into the rock as if it were as soft as butter, the story goes. Galgano was a hermit for the rest of his life. Four years after his death he was canonized and a chapel was built around the sword.Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, and InStyle, has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books. Her new book, The Blue, is a spy story set in the 18th-century porcelain world. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.comlast_img read more

Mumbai Man dies as oxygen cylinder explodes

first_img Advertising Top News Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies 0 Comment(s) Mumbai: Man dies as oxygen cylinder explodes The police said the incident took place when the deceased, Pannalal Yadav, was unloading the oxygen cylinder around 9.30 am in the Islampura area of Vikhroli (West). (Representational Image)A 35-YEAR-OLD man died while an oxygen cylinder that he was unloading at a shop exploded in Vikhroli on Tuesday morning. Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 The police said the incident took place when the deceased, Pannalal Yadav, was unloading the oxygen cylinder around 9.30 am in the Islampura area of Vikhroli (West). Such was the impact of the blast that Yadav’s limbs were blown to smithereens and an auto parked across the road was damaged.Yadav was employed at the Bombay Gas Suppliers Private Limited in Vikhroli.“The cylinder exploded suddenly and Yadav lost his hands and legs. Two persons, including a college student, who were walking by the road, sustained minor injuries,” said Suresh Gupta, Indian National Trade Union Congress’ (INTUC) Mumbai president. “I will write to the CM and the Mumbai Police commissioner seeking action against the shopowner. With so many residential premises in and around the area, the lives of so many people are being put at risk,” he added.An officer from Parksite police station in Vikhroli said negligence may have led to the accident.“We will most likely register an FIR,” he added. Advertising By Express News Service |Mumbai | Published: July 17, 2019 2:16:16 amlast_img read more

West Bengal Police intervene after BJP workers chanting Hanuman Chalisa block road

first_imgAccording to sources, the supporters had gathered in front of Howrah’s AC market on Dobson Road to chant Hanuman Chalisa. After some time, cops from Howrah City Police station arrived and tried to disperse the workers from the spot as they were blocking the road and had no permission.Police told iebangla that the event by BJP workers blocking the road was a hindrance to the movement of traffic. Hence, they requested the workers to move aside. However, the BJP supporters refused to give in and police had to intervene.BJP leader Ishrat Jahan, who was present on the spot during the clash, told iebangla, “Chanting Hanuman Chalisa is a religious affair. It wouldn’t have been much of a problem to allow that for ten minutes. It was unfair on the part of police to treat common people and the BJP workers this way. They have forcefully stopped us from chanting.” Read in BanglaThe BJP youth wing workers have been chanting Hanuman Chalisa at the Hanuman Mandir on Dobson Road for past two weeks. The police had barricaded a space for the devotees to pray. Delhi: Ex-BJP MLA acquitted for ‘stopping’ train in 2010 Advertising Mukul Roy claims 107 West Bengal MLAs from CPM, Congress, and TMC will join BJP 1 Comment(s) Related News Bengal clash, west bengal clash, bjp police clash, bengal bjp police clash, hanuman chalisa, bjp hanuman chalisa chanting, indian express BJP leader Ishrat Jahan at the Hanuman mandir on Dobson Road.Controversy erupted in Bengal’s Howrah area after BJP supporters organised a programme of chanting Hanuman Chalisa on Tuesday and police had to intervene to disperse the crowd. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 16, 2019 10:25:32 pm Day after quitting as Rajya Sabha MP, Neeraj Shekhar joins BJP last_img read more

Take 5 700 have faced pay cuts for not taking selfies… were

first_imgWritten by Maulshree Seth | Updated: July 14, 2019 2:45:46 am Up teacher, up teachers' attendance, barabanki teachers attendance, teachers salaries, attendance through selfie, indian express “Many of us travel from far to schools in interiors, with no network,” Verma says.Pawan Verma, 47, teacher in Barabanki* When was the order given?It was given in May by the district’s Chief Development Officer (CDO). It is being implemented rigorously now. Advertising * How does the system work?We are supposed to take a selfie and send it to a WhatsApp group. Schools start at 8 am and we are given grace time of about 5-10 minutes to post selfies. Those who fail to do so in the stipulated time stand to lose half the day’s pay and those who don’t do it at all lose the entire day’s salary. Salaries of 700 teachers have been deducted since May.* Is this applicable to all schools?There are 7,500 teachers in 3,150 primary and upper primary schools in the district, where this order is applicable.* Do teachers support the order?Teachers are unhappy because many of them travel from far-off places to schools in the interiors, where it’s difficult to reach. Moreover, some of these areas have network issues… Some senior teachers are not well-equipped with smartphones.* Has the attendance improved?Teachers have been trying to reach on time against all odds… But now, they are also using the WhatsApp groups to point out problems at their schools. Some have been posting selfies with stagnant water in the background. Top News In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Ancient grape seeds may link Sri Lankan trading port to Roman world

first_imgGrape seeds found in ancient Sri Lanka may have been imported by Roman merchants. iStock.com/RinoCdZ Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Ancient grape seeds may link Sri Lankan trading port to Roman world Eleanor Kingwell-Banham, an archaeobotanist at University College London, joined the team to study the plant remains sifted from the excavated soil. She found an abundance of locally grown rice grains, but also more exotic products: charred black pepper dating to 600–700 C.E. and a single clove from 900–1100 C.E.—an exceptionally rare find, because ancient people were very careful with their spices, her team reports today in Antiquity. “Because [spices] are so valuable, people in the past really made sure they didn’t lose them or burn them,” Kingwell-Banham says. “These things were worth more than gold.” The clove, in particular, must have made quite a journey—about 7000 kilometers from its native home in the Maluku Islands of Indonesia.The team also found remains that could link the port city to the ancient Mediterranean world—processed wheat grains dated to 100 to 200 C.E. and grape seeds dated to 650 to 800 C.E. Neither crop can grow in Sri Lanka’s wet, tropical climate, so they had to be imported, possibly from as far as Arabia or the Roman world. Kingwell-Banham says her team is studying the chemical isotopes absorbed by the plants to determine where they were grown.But no matter their precise origin, the coexistence of rice and wheat is evidence of Mantai’s “cosmopolitan cuisine,” in which both local and foreign foods were eaten, she says. The discovery of wheat and grapes in Mantai “is entirely new,” and shifts the focus on goods transported from South Asia to the Roman world, to goods that went in the other direction,” Coningham says.So were there Roman merchants living in Mantai, importing and cooking the foods of their homeland? “It’s certainly a possibility,” says Matthew Cobb, a historian who studies ancient Indian Ocean trade networks at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David in Lampeter. But no one has yet clinched the case with Roman ceramics. So exactly who in Mantai had a taste for Mediterranean food remains to be seen.*Update, 12 December, 9:33 a.m.: This story has been updated to include the date of the wheat grains found in Mantai. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Visit Mantai, nestled into a bay in northwestern Sri Lanka, and today you’ll see nothing but a solitary Hindu temple overlooking the sea. But 1500 years ago, Mantai was a bustling port where merchants traded their era’s most valuable commodities. Now, a study of ancient plant remains reveals traders from all corners of the world—including the Roman Empire—may have visited or even lived there.Mantai was a hub on the ancient trade networks that crisscrossed the Indian Ocean and connected the distant corners of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Middle East. The port town flourished between 200 B.C.E. and 850 C.E. During that time, it would have been a nexus for the spice trade, which ferried Indonesian cloves and Indian peppercorns to Middle Eastern and Roman kitchens.But for such a potentially important site in the ancient world, Mantai has been difficult for archaeologists to study. After excavations in the early 1980s, research was halted in 1984 by Sri Lanka’s civil war. “Mantai was firmly in the red zone,” says Robin Coningham, an archaeologist who studies South Asia at Durham University in the United Kingdom. Only after the fighting ended in 2009 could a team led by Sri Lanka’s Department of Archaeology return to continue excavations.last_img read more

Raja Dhale 19402019 A real fighter… there cant be another Ambedkarite like

first_imgWritten by Sadaf Modak, Kavitha Iyer | Mumbai | Published: July 17, 2019 4:32:23 am Post Comment(s) Advertising Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Top News Explained: The Hague rules on Kulbhushan Jadhav today However, it was Dhale’s essay in Marathi weekly Sadhana in 1972 that shot the group to prominence, according to J V Pawar, another co-founder. Amid celebrations to mark 25 years of Independence, Dhale wrote whether the Tricolour was any more than a piece of cloth if India’s freedom did not guarantee dignity for Dalits. His comments came in the wake of several cases of atrocities against Dalits.Speaking to The Indian Express in January last year, days after the Bhima Koregaon violence that had begun with an attack on Dalits visiting a memorial in the village, Dhale was contemplative. He repeated what he had said to the paper in February 2017 ahead of elections to the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation — that the Dalit movement lacked unity. “The Marathas are confined to Maharashtra, and still they feel this sense of power. The achhoot (untouchables),” he said, using the politically incorrect term rejected by most, “are spread all over India, in crores. What would happen if all of us fought together?”Dhale wasn’t simply alluding to the WhatsApp messages and other social media posts of the time — a call for an uprising against the ‘new Peshwai’ or upper caste dominance. As a founding member of the Dalit Panthers, and also as painter, poet and editor of ‘Vidroh’ magazine in the 1970s, he was also harking back to his own goals from that revolutionary era. He spoke about why young Ambedkarites must read Ambedkar first, and how factionalism and personal interests had affected the movement.Congress MP Hussain Dalwai recalled those heady days of the Dalit movement. “I was with the Yuvak Kranti Dal, and we had accompanied the Dalit Panthers to a village in Pune where there was ostracism of Dalits. Dhale was with us then. He was fearless, a real fighter,” Dalwai said, calling Dhale’s death a huge loss for the Dalit movement.For a group of 70-year-olds at Dhale’s Vikhroli residence, he was their first influence towards fighting against caste. “We began as volunteers for the movement through him. There cannot be another Ambedkarite like him,” said Dada Kamble. —With inputs from Manoj More in Pune Advertising Born in Nandre village in Sangli, Dhale had moved to Mumbai along with his uncle and aunt after he lost his parents at a young age. He studied at the Maratha Mandir High School and lived at the BDD Chawls in Worli.“Despite difficulty in accessing education, he was very keen on studying. He would say, ‘if Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar could study, what stops me?’” Gatha said. It was during his graduation at Siddharth College in South Mumbai that Dhale began participating in the Dalit movement.Writer Arjun Dangle, co-founder of the Dalit Panthers that was inspired by the Black Panthers’ resistance struggle for civil rights in the US, said Dhale was a voracious reader from a young age. “At that time, only a certain group of people from Mumbai and Pune would get published for the entertainment of dominant castes. Through his writing, he and others of the group, including Namdeo Dhasal, began speaking about the importance of voices from the Bahujan community, Adivasis, rural areas of the state,” Dangle said, adding that this was shortly followed by the formation of the Dalit Panthers in 1972. Raja Dhale (1940-2019)WRITER, ACTIVIST and co-founder of the Dalit Panthers movement, Raja Dhale (78), died in Mumbai on Tuesday after suffering cardiac arrest at his residence in Vikhroli. He is survived by his wife Deeksha and daughter Gatha.last_img read more

Donald Trump Should Channel Steve Jobs on Security

first_imgWe saw yet another government breach last week, and more secrets went out to WikiLeaks. I’m of a mixed mind on this one, because the CIA tools disclosed likely were emulated by others, and WikiLeaks is helping consumer technology companies ensure they no longer work.I don’t know about you, but I really don’t want any organization spying on me — not even my own government. Given how I often dress around the house, this is as much for their protection as my own.When Steve Jobs took over, Apple also had a severe leak problem, and he was pragmatic about fixing it. Ironically, he used the U.S. government’s approach as a template. As a side note, Jobs also had a WikiLeaks problem, but whether it really was a leak or was fake news was never determined. Now that is an interesting coincidence, given the topic.I’ll offer some suggestions about what Trump could learn from Steve Jobs, and I’ll close with my product of the week: the Jetson TX2, an amazing high-speed drone that uses Nvidia’s value-priced digital brain, to ensure that it doesn’t get you into trouble.last_img read more

Standard Bariatrics receives sleeve gastrectomy indication from FDA for STANDARD CLAMP

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 24 2018Standard Bariatrics, an innovator of surgical devices, has received a sleeve gastrectomy indication from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the STANDARD CLAMP®. “Standard Bariatrics is committed to creating superior bariatric surgery outcomes through device innovations. The acceptance of the supplemental data by the FDA to expand the U.S. indications of the STANDARD CLAMP® is another significant milestone for the Company,” said Jonathan Thompson MD, Founder and Chief Medical Officer of Standard Bariatrics. “With the patient’s health top priority, we aimed to standardize an anatomy-based approach to sleeve gastrectomy.”Related StoriesStudy uncovers origin of cell mask that hides stomach cancerSurgery can be beneficial for one type of primary central nervous system lymphomaBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryCurrent techniques and device usage for laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are highly variable, and studies show that freehand sleeve gastrectomy techniques can yield inconsistent pouch anatomy. Because of challenges, bariatric surgeons have been able to achieve the ideal sleeve anatomy less than 40% of the time, resulting in inconsistent outcomes for the patient including reduced weight loss and GERD.The STANDARD SLEEVE™ addresses issues of inconsistent surgical anatomy through an anatomy-based approach. Performed with the first-of-its-kind, purpose-built, disposable device, the STANDARD CLAMP® allows fixation of the full cut line across the entire stomach, enabling surgeons to plan and hold the staple line prior to dividing the stomach during sleeve gastrectomy.”The STANDARD CLAMP® allows planning, visualization and stabilization of the full staple line before staple firing, enabling bariatric surgeons to confidently achieve ideal surgical sleeve anatomy consistently,” said Ronald Galovich, Chief Commercial Officer of Standard Bariatrics. “We are excited about the opportunity to bring the STANDARD CLAMP® to every bariatric surgeon performing the sleeve gastrectomy procedure.”​ Source:http://standardbariatrics.com/last_img read more

Unraveling a rare genetic mutation related to growth disorders

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 1 2018What would happen if you suddenly stopped growing at age 12 or 13?Solving genetic growth mysteries and scheduling regular appointments with pediatric endocrinologists is atypical for most parents and pediatricians.However, for children with growth disorders–a classification that typically describes children below the third or above the 97th percentile of growth charts for their age–receiving a diagnosis is half the battle to reaching average height. Understanding and creating treatment for a growth disorder, which could stem from an underlying medical illness, a genetic mutation or a problem with endocrine function, such as the production or action of growth hormone, is often the next step.For Andrew Dauber, M.D., MMSc., the chief of endocrinology at Children’s National Health System, a third step is to use these clues to create larger datasets and blueprints to identify risk factors for rare growth disorders. By understanding genetic markers of growth disorders, endocrinologists can identify solutions and create plans for multidisciplinary care to help children reach developmental milestones and receive coordinated care throughout their lifespan.A case study that Dauber and his research team continue to explore is how to correct for mutations in the PAPPA2 gene, which regulates human growth by releasing a key growth factor called insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Dauber and his colleagues recently described a mutation in PAPPA2, observed in two families with multiple children affected with significant short stature. He found that this mutation decreased the bioavailability of IGF-1, stunting the growth and development of the children who carry this mutation.While the PAPPA2 mutation is rare, endocrinologists, like Dauber, who understand its function and dysregulation can create solutions to support IGF-1 bioavailability, thereby supporting healthy growth and development in children.Understanding barriers to IGF-1 function can also help researchers gain insight into the relationship between PAPPA2, levels of circulating insulin in the body, which could cause insulin resistance, and other growth hormones. For now, Dauber and his research team are exploring how to use PAPPA2 to increase IGF-1 in circulation among people with height disorders in the hopes of improving their growth.Related StoriesSome people treated for type 1 diabetes may have monogenic diabetes, study findsStudy: Causes of anorexia are likely metabolic and psychologicalResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndrome”The population of children who have PAPPA2 mutations is small and we’re finding out that two children could respond to the same treatment in different ways,” says Dauber. “One medication could work modestly in one child and support short growth spurts, such as growing by 5 or 6 cm a year. It could also create undesirable side effects, such as headaches and migraines in another, and render it ineffective. However, the clues we walk away with enable us to test new solutions, and confirm or dissolve our hunches, about what may be preventing the bioactive release of essential growth hormones.”To generate controls for healthy patterns of growth and development, Dauber and his research team are analyzing the relationship between PAPPA2, STC2 and IGFBP-3 concentrations among 838 relatively healthy pediatric participants, ages 3-18, with traditional growth patterns.They are studying PAPPA2, STC2 and intact IGFBP-3 concentrations throughout childhood and the researchers are already surprised to find PAPPA2, a positive modulator of growth and IGF- bioavailability, decreased with age, while STC2, a negative modulator and traditional growth inhibitor, increased with age.”As pediatric endocrinology researchers and clinicians, we’re looking at the pathology of traditional growth patterns and growth disorders with an open mind,” says Dr. Dauber. “These data sets are invaluable as they confirm or challenge our theories, which enable us to create and test new forms of personalized treatments. We’ll continue to share this knowledge, which informs other researchers and accelerates the field of pediatric endocrinology.” Source:https://innovationdistrict.childrensnational.org/pappa2-a-genetic-mystery/last_img read more

Innovative elastic contrast media for more sensitive MRI diagnostics

first_img Source:https://www.leibniz-fmp.de/press-media/press-releases/press-releases-single-view1/article/more-sensitive-mri-diagnostics-thanks-to-innovative-elastic-contrast-media.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 29 2018Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. It is made possible by using an “elastic” protein structure that can absorb dissolved xenon in a self-regulating way: The greater the amount of this noble gas, the higher the quality of the image, without the need to adjust the amount of contrast medium applied.Nowadays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an indispensable method for diagnosing diseases and monitoring the course of treatment. It creates sectional images of the human body without the use of any harmful radiation. Typically, the water molecules in the tissue are exposed to a strong magnetic field. However, MRI is very insensitive and needs a high concentration of molecules in order to absorb a usable signal. Contrast media are often used to improve diagnostics in order to detect specific changes such as tumors more clearly. However, even with these contrast media, the sensitivity of MRI cannot be significantly increased, and many markers that are known from cell biology cannot be detected during imaging. Besides this, the safety of certain contrast media containing the element gadolinium is currently the subject of increasing discussion. “We need new, improved methods in which as little contrast medium as possible influences as much of the signal-transmitting substance as possible, which is typically water,” says FMP researcher Dr. Leif Schröder. He and his team have now achieved an important breakthrough.The researchers have been working for some time in developing contrast media based on xenon, a harmless noble gas. The group employs a process with powerful lasers in which the xenon is artificially magnetized and then – even in small quantities – generates measurable signals. To detect specific cellular disease markers, the xenon has to be bound to them for a short time. In a cooperation with scientists from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) funded by the Human Frontiers Science Program (HFSP), Dr. Leif Schröder and his team have now looked into a new class of contrast media that binds the xenon reversibly. These are hollow protein structures produced by certain bacteria in order to regulate the depth at which they float in water, similar to a miniaturized swim bladder in fish but on a nanometer scale. The research group led by cooperation partner Mikhail Shapiro at Caltech introduced these so-called “gas vesicles” some time ago as MR contrast media. However, it was not yet known how well they could be “charged” with xenon.Related StoriesMother calls for protein shake regulation after daughter diesExperts release scientific statement on predicting survival for cardiac arrest survivorsEKF’s DiaSpect Tm hemoglobin analyzer used for anemia study in remote region of GhanaIn the study, which has been published in the “ACS Nano” journal, both groups now describe how these vesicles form an ideal contrast medium: They can “elastically” adjust their influence on the measured xenon. “The protein structures have a porous wall structure through which the xenon can flow in and out. Unlike conventional contrast media, the gas vesicles always absorb a fixed portion of the xenon that is provided by the environment, in other words also larger amounts if more Xe is provided,” Dr. Leif Schröder reports. This characteristic can be employed in MRI diagnostics, because more xenon must be used in order to obtain better images. The concentration of a conventional contrast medium would also need to be adjusted in order to achieve a change in signal for all the xenon atoms. The gas vesicles, on the other hand, automatically fill up with more xenon when this is offered by the environment. “They act like a kind of balloon, to which an external pump is attached. If the balloon is ‘inflated’ by xenon atoms flowing into the gas vesicle, its size does not change, but the pressure does increase – similar to a bicycle tire tube,” explains Dr. Leif Schröder. Because much more xenon passes into the vesicles than with conventional contrast media, the xenon atoms can then be read out much better after they have left the vesicle again and show a changed signal. This way, the image contrast is many times higher than the background noise while the quality of the image is significantly improved. These contrast media can thus also be used to identify disease markers that occur in relatively low concentrations. During the further course of the cooperation, the two groups intend to test these contrast media in initial animal studies. The newly discovered behavior will be a decisive advantage in order to use these very sensitive contrast media in living tissue as well. Dr. Leif Schröder and his team were able to make the first MRI images with particle concentrations one million times lower than those of the contrast media currently employed.last_img read more